Wood Turned Into Art Became A Job

Woodturner, carver and sculptor Binh Pho’s wooden vessels are so incredibly ornate that it’s a little shocking to find out the artist didn’t turn his first lathe until 1992. Built a 15,000 square foot area around the building is marked by piles of box elder wood.Inside, the ground floor is covered with wood shavings and sawdust, while the second floor is home to many of Binh’s works in various stages of piece is breathtaking in its beauty and piece, like the experiences that came together to form Binh Pho’s destiny, is unique.

Ironically, it was the end of the war that drew Binh Pho into the center of the storm of violence and suffering that had raged for so many years in the countryside surrounding the North Vietnamese troops began their final push into Saigon, the Americans were trying desperately to evacuate South Vietnamese who had worked with them and might therefore be at risk for Pho’s father, a doctor, had trained in America and was a member of the South Vietnamese army.

Ironically, it was the end of the war that drew Binh Pho into the center of the storm of violence and suffering that had raged for so many years in the countryside surrounding Saigon. In January 2013, Binh and Kevin launched their second book, Shadow of the Turning (). Like its predecessor, it focuses on art, philosophy, and storytelling but is an entirely fictional story, blending the mythic worlds of fairy tale, fantasy, romance, and adventure. Pho will demonstrate and discuss lathe-turning techniques for creating thin-wall vessels.

Since then, he has worked as a cabinetmaker, furniture designer and maker, sculptor of stone and wood, international male model, carpenter, and most recently woodturner. Binh is in demand as a lecturer and demonstrator, with work exhibited internationally and in the permanent collections of several museums. The man taught Binh to draw, and this skill eventually opened the door to the university.

At the time, Pho was holding down a job and building wooden furniture and boxes as a hobby, but with no ambition of becoming the full-time artist he is today. Pho will discuss each of these techniques at Saturday’s demonstration, presented by the Wilmington Area Woodturners Association, a chapter of the American Association of Woodturners. In 2000, I decided to leave my office work to allow me more time to become a woodturner.

Using a dental knife meant to cut teeth, Pho perforates the vessel, opening elegant patterns of negative space as if he were working with a more malleable material. When he’s not traveling to exhibit or demonstrate his art, Pho is working in his studio. In the book, curator and author Kevin Wallace, shared Binh Pho’s life story, Vietnamese history and philosophy. In taking it away, however, Binh Pho’s destiny as an artist, a husband, and a father took shape. His work has been published in Fine Woodworking magazine, the American Woodturner journal, 500 Wood Bowls, and Wood Art Today 2.

In 1975, as the war drew to a close, Binh was a sophomore in college majoring in architecture. Glenn will discuss various cutting-edge profiles and setting up a sharpening system to suit the needs of a woodturner. Create amazing pieces quickly with these never-before-seen secrets from a master woodturner. Binh Pho is in demand as a lecturer and demonstrator and his work is exhibited internationally and in the permanent collection of numerous museums. Binh Pho began selling his work in 1995, quickly gaining the attention of art collectors and devoted increasing time to his work.

In 2005, Joey was awarded a bursary from The Worshipful Company of Turners of London to attend the AAW symposium in Kansas and take classes with leading turners including a 3-day intensive course with Binh Pho. Mike has been a professional woodturner since 1992, specializing in utilitarian items that he wholesales to American Crafts galleries across the U.S. Mike acquires all his material from local urban sources (tree trimmers and city landfills).

Pho moved to America from Vietnam in 1979 after spending eight months in a refugee camp on a deserted Malaysian island. Join master woodturner Brian McEvoy, from One Good Turn, as he shows you his secrets to creating deep vessels using the large captive boring bar. Using a lathe, Pho goes beyond even the most daring woodturner’s aspiration of achieving eighth-inch thickness, working the vessel down to paper-thin dimensions. Professional woodturner and instructor Mike Mahoney has cored thousands of bowls using the McNaughton Center Saver.

Binh is a critically acclaimed artist, known for an expansive approach to work in wood and glass that includes painting and a unique exploration of positive and negative space. The story of his journey from an idyllic childhood in Vietnam, the rise of Communism, and his escape to the United States are shared in the book River of Destiny: The Life and Work of Binh Pho, written by Kevin Wallace and published in 2006, in conjunction with a retrospective of his work at the Long Beach Museum of Art. Binh Pho’s father, a doctor, had trained in America and was a member of the South Vietnamese army. Each piece, like the experiences that came together to form Binh Pho’s destiny, is unique.

In 2006, the book River of Destiny: The Life and Work of Binh Pho was published in conjunction with an exhibition of the artist’s work at the Long Beach Museum of Art in California. Pho is delivering a demonstration of his woodworking techniques Saturday at the St. Mark Catholic Church’s fellowship hall. What: A public demonstration by Chicago-based woodturner, carver and sculptor Binh Pho.

The story of his journey from an idyllic childhood in Vietnam, the rise of Communism and his escape to the United States is shared in the book River of Destiny: The Life and Work of Binh Pho, published in 2006, in conjunction with a retrospective of his work at the Long Beach Museum of Art. Pho bought his first table saw in 1987, and in 1992, he saw a woodturner working a vessel on a lathe. Family in the , it would seem, was taken from Binh Pho as the last helicopter left without him on that day in taking it away, however, Binh Pho’s destiny as an artist, a husband, and a father took shape.

In 2005, I spent three days with Binh Pho after he had demonstrated at the Association of Woodturners of Great Briton Seminar. Pho occasionally casts the wood in glass or metal, or paints his sculptures in a bright palette in a style reflective of his Vietnamese upbringing. When he got here, Pho developed an interest in woodworking after seeing the various tools inside his younger brother’s high school workshop, but he wasn’t about to pursue it professionally. The story is illustrated” using an exciting new body of work by Binh that combines woodturning, sculpture, painting, and art glass. Binh Pho was born in Vietnam in 1955, at the beginning of the American intervention in the Vietnamese civil war.