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Sometimes it’s nail holes and sometimes it’s rotten wood, but your projects will often require you to patch wood. The particular kind of resins that must be used in Smith’s Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer in order to obtain all its usual performance features, which have made the product famous, do not cure well below about 50° F and essentially stop curing by 40° F. This is a normal characteristic of these products, and has been well known to chemists for half a century.

Being around the resin today gave me a headache and I’m realizing I need to sequester off a less used room in my house for it. I’ve been trying acrylics, but acrylics aren’t very reliable and varnishes are just as bad with the harmful fumes… so I’m just trying to figure out what my best option is for quality artwork while still maintaining as little toxicity as possible.

Specifically, you would want to 1) use a brittle resin (not Epoxy but rather polyester resin, making sure that resin contains Styrene which is your brittle” agent -note that Styrene is a nasty chemical so use gloves and mask etc.) 2) apply a thin layer and 3) submit it to stress (thermal – high and low temperatures or tensile stress by bending the support or having a support that expands at higher temperatures and baking it during the curing process).

When fungi and bacteria eat their way into wood, they destroy the material and create porosity on a gradient between the sound wood, the slightly porous wood with fungal spores in that region but the wood apparently sound, and then more obviously deteriorated wood, until at the extreme there is wood so porous and so obviously deteriorated you could stick your finger into it.

Lf a longer time transpires (more than 48 hours), a light overall sanding together with a solvent wipe is advisable (a solvent wipe is recommended between all coats if allowed to cure (see heading, Clean-up, Solvents, & Thinners ). In addition, the resin of the initial coat may tend to make the wood grain fuzzy, making a light sanding necessary prior to the second coat.

When repairing wood that has mild dry rot, the CPES will travel through capillary action along the abnormal porosity which dry rot fungus creates within the wood, as long as it continues to be fed in. Impregnation of wood with CPES changes the cellulose of wood (which fungi and bacteria find tasty and easily digestible) into epoxy-impregnated cellulose which resists further attack by fungi and bacteria while reinforcing the wood, accomplishing restoration.

Being a chemist and a physicist, I was able to approach the problem of wood rotting and paint failing scientifically, which no one else in this or any related business ever did; there were and are many people making epoxy products, but none of them had a comparable background and were able to approach the problem by identifying the root causes of wood failure and product failure.

The resin system is formulated primarily with resins derived from wood and therefore the resin system is compatible with the chemistry of wood in a way that no other resin system is. The resin system is very hydrophobic to inhibit liquid water accumulation in impregnated regions while allowing (via the designed porosity remaining in the wood) the diffusion of water vapor through the impregnated region as well as the natural porosity of the wood.

Axson Translux D150 water clear epoxy casting resin system, this is a water simulation product and is suitable for floral casting and embedding, it also allows an object to be placed in the middle of the resin without any contact with the walls, with a successive casting to totally encapsulate object, this resin will produce a water clear resin with a Shore A90 or D50 hardness.

They will not move with the wood, and the bond between wood fibers treated with them and any subsequent filler will be very poor compared to that between CPES and Epoxy fillers, either Fill-It or our Epoxy Adhesives such as Layup and Laminating adhesive If you want long lasting repairs you must use two part epoxy products, and of all of those available on the market, these are the best.

When repairing wood that has mild dry rot, the CPES will migrate along the abnormal porosity which dry rot fungus creates within the wood, as long as it continues to be fed in. Impregnation of wood with CPES changes the cellulose of wood (which fungi and bacteria find tasty and easily digestible) into epoxy-impregnated cellulose which resists further attack by fungi and bacteria while reinforcing the wood, accomplishing restoration.

With wood wizzards, if you start with dry looking wood, and the temperature is 70F, you can apply the liquid resin (a primer and wood petrifier) 20 min after treating with bio cleaner (to clean) and timbor solution (timbor powder dissolved in water to kill off any fungi), even though the wood would still have some wetness or dampness in it from the treatment.

Using polyester resins quite often results in a separation of the layers (the resin separates from the painting) or cracks. I have used the 1% catylyst to the resin and also doubled it as it is only 150 ml tester mould. Furthermore, epoxy in any size batch will start to thicken the moment hardener is mixed in, so using multiple small batches will keep the resin thinner over application work time.

Of all the fillers epoxy would be best but in this case a Dutchman repair would probably give you the strongest solution. Epoxy, while it may initially appear similar to the pancake syrup has a hardener which is changing the viscosity from the second it is mixed in, so the epoxy may or may not have enough time to level as it cures. Other than removing and replacing the wood I was wondering if there is a patching and graining(texturing) technique that you are aware of that I could do to give a rough sawn effect. I am using CR20 Polyester Casting Resin and adding a pigment paste to the mixture.

For a really easy clean up job run some plastic sealing tape along the outside edges of the joint before applying the epoxy; when the epoxy is cured remove the tape along with the excess. More expensive to manufacture than the standard petro-based resins, but it bonds better to wood and is tougher and more flexible than any other epoxy resin. So external/shop temperature is an important variable in changing the viscosity when handling epoxy. When I turned the glasses over, I could see the resin weeping through the bottom of the glasses.