FAQs About Makai Project Handplanes And Bodysurfing

Handplanes, unlike surfboards, are not a floatation device, rather a planning device. It came back with vyce indentations along both sides…I nearly passed out….a rare pistol ruined by an ‘expert’…at the very least he should have used clean copper guards but it didn’t need to be held in a vyce and if it had…surely you would remove the grips and hold from the iron there where damage didn’t hit you in the face…and even so, you’d protect the metal from the serrated vyce jaws….If you want to learn how to use hand tools…buy detailed and expert books from early 20th C for example.

If you can only afford to start out with one bench plane”, then I’d recommend buying a jack plane, specifically a bevel down Stanley No. 5 metal Jack Plane (Bailey” style or Bedrock” style, if you can afford it) or a Lie-Nielsen No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane (bevel up…additionally works on difficult grain, end grain, and in concert with shooting boards ). Read this article by Christopher Schwarz to choose between Bevel up vs. Bevel down hand planes.

The earliest known examples of the woodworking plane have been found in Pompeii although other Roman examples have been unearthed in Britain and Germany The Roman planes resemble modern planes in essential function, most having iron wrapping a wooden core top, bottom, front and rear and an iron blade secured with a wedge One example found in Cologne has a body made entirely of bronze without a wooden core.

Stanley’s metal bench planes were first numbered based on size—the No.1 was 5 ½ inches, the No. 8 was 24 inches, and so on. Many of the company’s planes and tools became standard for every woodworker’s tool kit, including the No. 80 scrapper (used to give wood a glass-like surface), and the classic No. 45 combination plane, which is like a plow plane, but also cuts various curved molding forms.

Woden is not my inept misspelling of ‘wooden’, it’s the name of a Germanic neopagan god, but that’s by the by. The Woden plane is a decent plane that follows the Leonard Bailey patterns of construction, so, whereas Woden is the brand name, Leonard Bailey is the designer and the originator and I have always enjoyed using the Woden planes alongside my Stanleys and Records.

The chief difference in action between a chisel and a plane in paring is this: the back of the chisel lies close down on the surface of the wood that is cut, and acts as a guide; whereas, in the plane, the cutter is elevated at an angle away from the surface of the wood, and only its cutting edge touches the wood, and it is held and guided mechanically by the plane mechanism.